Thursday , January 28 2021

NASA & # 39; hits jackpot & # 39; in mission to bring a sample from an asteroid back when Bennu contains water



NASA's OSIRIS-REX spacecraft have found water locked deep inside the asteroid, hoping to bring a sample back to earth.

The vessel finally arrived at asteroid Bennu last week, more than two years after spraying from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

Now, NASA says it has made the right decision & # 39; to choose his goal.

Scroll down for video

The animation above shows our closest look yet at the rumroch, showing Bennu in full rotation from approx. 50 km away (80 km). It was caught in four hours and 18 minutes

WHAT WERE NASA FINDED?

Data obtained from the two spectrometers of the spacecraft, OSIRIS-REx Visible and Infrared Spectrometer (OVIRS) and OSIRIS-REx Thermal Emission Spectrometer (OTES), reveal the presence of molecules containing oxygen and hydrogen atoms bound together, known as hydroxyls. & # 39;

The team suspects that these hydroxyl groups exist globally across the asteroid in waterborne clay minerals, which means that Bennu's rocky material at some point interacted with water.

Although Bennu himself is too small to host floating water, the finding shows that at some point liquid water was present on Benny's overall body, a much larger asteroid.

"Newly analyzed data from NASA's Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, the Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REX) mission has revealed water locked in the clays that make up its scientific goal," said the asteroid Bennu, "NASA.

"The presence of hydrated minerals across the asteroid confirms that Bennu, a remnant from early in the formation of the solar system, is an excellent example of the OSIRIS REx mission to study the composition of primitive volatiles and organic substances , "said Amy Simon, OVIR's deputy instrument researcher at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

When samples of this material are returned by the Mission to Earth in 2023, researchers will receive a treasure chest of new information about our solar system's history and development.

Although Bennu himself is too small to host floating water, the finding shows that at some point liquid water was present on Benny's overall body, a much larger asteroid.

During the mission's access phase, between mid August and early December, the spacecraft traveled 1.4 million miles (2.2 million km) on its journey from Earth to reach a location 12 km (19 km) from Bennu on December 3rd.

During this time, the science team on the ground directed three of the spacecraft's instruments against Bennu and began to make the mission's first scientific observations of the asteroid.

OSIRIS-REX is NASA's first asteroid experiment mission.

Data obtained from the two spectrometers of the spacecraft, OSIRIS-REx Visible and Infrared Spectrometer (OVIRS) and OSIRIS-REx Thermal Emission Spectrometer (OTES), reveal the presence of molecules containing oxygen and hydrogen atoms bound together, known as hydroxyls. & # 39;

The team suspects that these hydroxyl groups exist globally across the asteroid in waterborne clay minerals, which means that Bennu's rocky material at some point interacted with water.

NASA's OSIRIS-REX spacecraft have finally arrived at the asteroid Bennu more than two years after spraying from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The animation above shows the craft's approach to the object, starting August 17, when it was over 1,300,000 miles from Bennu to November 27 when it was only 40 miles away

Although Bennu himself is too small to host floating water, the finding shows that at some point liquid water was present on Benny's overall body, a much larger asteroid.

One outlier from the predicted shape model is the size of the large blocks near Bennus south pole.

The base-based model has calculated this rock to be at least 33 meters (10 meters) in height.

Preliminary calculations from OCAMS observations show that the basement is closer to 50 meters in height, with a width of approximately 180 meters (55 meters).

Bennus surface material is a mixture of very rocky, clumpy areas and a few relatively slippery regions that lack stone blocks.

However, the amount of rock blocks on the surface is higher than expected.

OSIRIS-REX will use it next year in circulation around its target before it falls short, so it can get close enough to collect a sample of dirt and rock from the surface.

HOW SHOULD NASA'S OSIRIS REX MISSION TAKE ANY ASTEROID WORK?

Osiris-Rex is the first American mission designed to return a piece of asteroid to Earth.

Researchers say that the old asteroid could keep track of the origin of life.

It is believed to have formed 4.5 billion years ago, a rest of the solar system building block.

The spacecraft launched on September 8, 2016 at 19:05 EST aboard an Atlas V rocket.

After a careful study of Bennu to characterize the asteroid and find the most promising test pages, Osiris-Rex collects between 2 and 70 ounces (about 60 to 2000 grams) surface material with its robot arm and returns the sample to the ground via a detachable capsule in 2023.

To catch samples on the surface, hover the hand tool over a certain area and "send it down with a very slow and cautious" 4 inch (10 cm) per. Second.

The spacecraft will also carry a laser altimeter, a series of cameras from the University of Arizona, spectrometers and detectors that resemble radar, using light instead of radio waves to measure the distance.

& # 39; Our first data shows that the team chose the right asteroid as the goal of the OSIRIS-REx mission. We have not discovered invincible problems at Bennu so far, "said Dante Lauretta, OSIRIS-REx researcher at the University of Arizona, Tucson.

& # 39; The spacecraft is healthy and the science tools work better than necessary. It's time that our adventure begins. & # 39;

"We have arrived," technicians said, spurring high fives and complaining about the control room.

Just a few days ago, Osiris-Rex bowed his mechanical arm through a wide range of movements for the first time in space before reaching Bennu; Eventually, this instrument will be used to pick a regolith sample from the surface to bring home.

The vessel has now traveled more than a billion miles since its launch in September 2016.

Osiris-Rex's ultimate goal is to bring a regolith sample of at least 2.1 ounces back. It will first examine the asteroid's surface for a year before choosing a safe and "scientifically interesting" place to scoop up some stones.

If everything goes well, the handle will bring the sample back to ground in September 2023.

Osiris-Rex has returned photos during the journey, revealing glimpses of the then target and even our own planet from millions of miles.

In August, the craftsman made his first picture of the asteroid Bennu.

While the blurred snapshot might not look much, its first appearance was the closest we have come to rumrock yet, 1.4 million miles away.

The craft also caught a look at Earth and the moon in their "orbital dance" back in January.

Asteroid Bennu, which Osiris-Rex will use for the next few years to study, is said to be a carbon-like rock knot that can contain organic materials or molecular precursors to life.

  NASA aired live coverage of its arrival starts at 11:45 pm ET, shortly before the spacecraft began a 20 second burn, putting it on the right lane around the asteroid. The artist's impression

NASA aired live coverage of its arrival starts at 11:45 pm ET, shortly before the spacecraft began a 20 second burn, putting it on the right lane around the asteroid. The artist's impression

Osiris-Rex captured a super-resolution show of the asteroid Bennu on October 29, 2018. The image was created using eight images obtained by the spacecraft from a distance of about 205 miles (330 kilometers)

Osiris-Rex captured a super-resolution view (left) of the asteroid Bennu on October 29, 2018. The image was created using eight images obtained by the spacecraft from a distance of about 205 miles (330 kilometers)

"Analyzing a test from Bennu will help planetary scientists better understand the role asteroids can have played in providing life-creating connections to the planet," explains NASA.

"We know that we have studied Bennu through earth and space-based telescopes that it is a carbonaceous or carbon-rich asteroid. Carbon is hinged on which organic molecules hang.

Bennu is probably rich in organic molecules that are made of chains of carbon bound with atoms of oxygen, hydrogen and other elements of a chemical recipe that make all known living things.

"In addition to carbon, Bennu can also have another component important for life: water that is trapped in the minerals that make up the asteroid."

The Great Binocular Telescope Observatory located at Mount Graham in Arizona spotted Osiris-Rex (Red) in September 2017, about a year after it launched

This September 11, 2016 picture shows a Centaur's top stage lift in Space Launch Complex 41 on the river's Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, where it was linked to the United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket first stage booster carrying OSIRIS REX

This September 11, 2016 picture shows a Centaur's top stage lift in Space Launch Complex 41 on the river's Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, where it was linked to the United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket first stage booster carrying OSIRIS REX

When Osiris is ready to collect a sample, it will fall closer to Bennu and float above the surface like a hummingbird, with only its mechanical arm close enough to touch the asteroid.

The Touch-and-Go Sample Acquisition Mechanism (TAGSAM) will suck up the regoliths, kicked off their nitrogen gas jet, and hopefully gather enough to study at home.

Researchers estimate that the asteroid is formed about 4.5 billion years ago.

"Bennu is a reluctant fragment of the sunlight's tumultuous formation, & # 39; says NASA.

"Some of the mineral fragments inside Bennu could be older than the solar system. These microscopic dust can be the same as spotted from dying stars and eventually assembled to make the Sun and its planets nearly 4.6 billion years ago.


Source link