Thursday , January 21 2021

The number of influenza cases in Germany increased significantly



In the last week, about 9,200 confirmed influenza infections were reported in the laboratory – it is not too late for an influenza vaccine.

The number of influenza cases in Germany has increased significantly. Last week, about 9,200 laboratory-confirmed influenza infections were reported, according to the Flu Working Group on Thursday in their latest weekly report. It was about twice as many as in the previous week.

Since October, a total of 20,100 confirmed influenza cases and 49 deaths have been reported so far. The number of unreported cases is likely to be higher, because not all influenzaes are specified by the physician. How strong the current influenza outbreak is is difficult to predict.

It's not too late for a flu shot

The influenza season last winter was exceptionally strong. In total, about 334,000 laboratory-confirmed influenza diseases were registered in Germany in the 2017/18 season.

also read: Influenza 2019 – What is behind flu symptoms – without fever?

For an influenza vaccine, it is not too late, according to the health insurance BarmerHowever, after the injection, it takes approx. two weeks until vaccine protection is established. Thereafter, the risk of influenza is significantly lower, but not entirely excluded.

This winter, the flu vaccine is taken with a quadruple vaccineIn particular, Robert Koch Institute advises people over the age of 60, pregnant women, chronically ill and medical staff for an influenza vaccine.

Join the flu study:

More on this topic: Does your nose have this color so quickly to the doctor.

hex / cfm / AFP

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