Friday , May 14 2021

There is a big clue in the "Toy Story 4" Teaser




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Woody, Buzz Lightyear and Jessie, who are in a wooden toy with other toys. photo credit: GettyGetty

At first sight Toy Story 4 The teaser trailer is a little more than an announcement; A proclamation to those who did not know that Disney / Pixar rolled the dice on a fourth input to possibly the most perfect trilogy in film history (please guys, do not touch this one).

The familiar faces of Andy's old toys frolic in a circle, their harmony was interrupted by the appearance of a villain, homemade toy, a spork man as the new owner Bonnie probably glued himself.

He screams in the midst of one of the major existential crises that toys seem to be undergoing regularly and explains, "I do not belong here! I'm not a toy." And that's it – that's all we have.

So, what does this tell us? Rather much, actually. For Toy Story The story has been constant over three films – for all their superficial differences, these stories explore all identities. Woody, Buzz and Jessy's problems can all be summarized with the sentence: "I no longer have a place in the world."

Toy Story saw Woody's role as number one given by Buzz, while Buzz had to face the crushing insight that he was no intergalactic super hero but just a piece of sensitive plastic. Toy Story 2 saw Woody & thanks to the fact that he grew quickly, but also that he was extremely valuable – a collector's item, which may be better after glass.

Buzz, when he saw a store shelf stacked with Buzz Lightyear clones, all under the same space worth fraud he once was, understands that he is not half as unique as he would like to think and convinces Woody that the purpose of life is to give joy to children.

Toy Story 3 The gang battle saw that Andy had cultivated them for a long time and that their future could be in a "guest house", ie. nurseries. After going through a close death experience in the twilight, the toys decide that they enjoy a whole new life under young Bonnie.

I have written about all this in greater depth before (I have seen these movies more than any adult man should), and it is sensible that the fourth post follows another identity crisis. So what can it be?

Imposter syndrome. For the sponge is composed of some ordinary household items glued together, carried by Bonnie. He is Frankenstein's monster, an outsider made of discarded body parts, uncertain of his role in society.

Toy Story 4 can ask the question of what it means to be a toy – is a perfectly shaped plastic plastic, fresh from the assembly line at a Chinese factory, more valuable than a created garbage? Does the spider like to be part of the gang or is he sentenced to disintegrate in the garbage from where he came?

Maybe I'm convincing things, but these movies are surprisingly deep. Andy's toys have suffered a lot of existential concern over these three stories, and every movie seems to ask a more ambitious question.

Personally, I would love to see toys threatened by the appearance of YouTube unboxing videos, but let's leave it for number 5 – if Disney / Pixar ever threatens to do it.

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Woody, Buzz Lightyear and Jessie, who are in a wooden toy with other toys. photo credit: GettyGetty

At first sight Toy Story 4 The teaser trailer is a little more than an announcement; A proclamation to those who did not know that Disney / Pixar rolled the dice on a fourth input to possibly the most perfect trilogy in film history (please guys, do not touch this one).

The familiar faces of Andy's old toys frolic in a circle, their harmony was interrupted by the appearance of a villain, homemade toy, a spork man like the new owner Bonnie probably glued himself.

He screams in the midst of one of the major existential crises that toys seem to be undergoing regularly and explains, "I do not belong here! I'm not a toy." And that's it – that's all we have.

So, what does this tell us? Rather much, actually. For Toy Story The story has been constant over three films – for all their superficial differences, these stories explore all identities. Woody, Buzz and Jessy's problems can all be summarized with the sentence: "I no longer have a place in the world."

Toy Story saw Woody's role as number one given by Buzz, while Buzz had to face the crushing insight that he was no intergalactic super hero but just a piece of sensitive plastic. Toy Story 2 Woody saw that he was aging fast, but also that he was extremely valuable – a collector's item, which may be better after glass.

Buzz, when he saw a store shelf stacked with Buzz Lightyear clones, all under the same space worth fraud he once was, understands that he is not half as unique as he would like to think and convinces Woody that the purpose of life is to give joy to children.

Toy Story 3 The gang battle saw that Andy had cultivated them for a long time and that their future could be in a "guest house", ie. nurseries. After going through a close death experience in the twilight, the toys decide that they enjoy a whole new life under young Bonnie.

I have written about all this in greater depth before (I have seen these movies more than any adult man should), and it is sensible that the fourth post follows another identity crisis. So what can it be?

Imposter syndrome. For the sponge is composed of some ordinary household items glued together, carried by Bonnie. He is Frankenstein's monster, an outsider made of discarded body parts, uncertain of his role in society.

Toy Story 4 can ask the question of what it means to be a toy – is a perfectly shaped plastic plastic, fresh from the assembly line at a Chinese factory, more valuable than a created garbage? Does the spider like to be part of the gang or is he sentenced to disintegrate in the garbage from where he came?

Maybe I'm convincing things, but these movies are surprisingly deep. Andy's toys have suffered a lot of existential concern over these three stories, and every movie seems to ask a more ambitious question.

Personally, I would love to see toys threatened by the appearance of YouTube unboxing videos, but let's leave it for number 5 – if Disney / Pixar ever threatens to do it.


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