Monday , March 1 2021

Former Cowboys Linebacker Jeff Rohrer Comes Like Gay



As a linebacker who helped leader Yale to the Ivy League championships, while starting with the mid-1980s Dallas Cowboys, for almost his entire life, Jeff Rohrer kept a secret.

Or more precisely, he lay lying to himself.

But when Rohrer began to tell the truth to himself and those in his life, he found that he never had anything to fear.

"What should I do then come?"

The 53th overall pick in the 1982 draft played Rohrer at 6 feet-3, 230 pounds. He was a reserve for his first three seasons, but started 40 games from 1985-87. During the 1988 training session, Rohrer needed surgery for an incisive disc in his back and missed the entire season.

In 1989, Cowboys employed Jimmy Johnson, and Rohrer was cut as Johnson remade roster.

Throughout that time, Rohrer did his best to play the role of "straight" football player with teammates and family, internal wrestling with what he knew was his truth: he is gay.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "" Live with my family in it [Southern California] society, that was not acceptable, "Rohrer told OutSports. "It was not part of the plan, and it would not happen." When I went to Yale, that was the same, and then I was drafted by the Cowboys. What should I do, then come out? "" Data Reaction = " 38 ">" Live with my family in it [Southern California] society, that was not acceptable, "said Rohrer to OutSports." It was not part of the plan, and it would not happen. When I went to Yale it was the same there. And then I was drafted by the Cowboys. What should I do, then come out? "

And prolonged stereotypes did not help.

"Soccer is a gladiator sport. It's very, very physical, very tough. At least at this point in our society, toughness is not associated with gay society." It's not a natural fit for many people, "said Rohrer.

Despite his fear, Rohrer does not recall that he heard some gay sexes in Cowboy's dressing room.

Rohrer was married to a woman (they have now been divorced for a decade), had two children and lived a life he enjoyed; After his NFL career ended, he moved back to California and is a successful television commercial producer.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = ""So many nights I called myself to sleep, felt like Wolfman, or Jekyll and Hyde, or Frankenstein, a kind of monster that only comes out when it's a full moon that always lives in the shadows," he said."data-reaction time =" 43 ">"So many nights I called myself to sleep, felt like Wolfman, or Jekyll and Hyde, or Frankenstein, a kind of monster that only comes out when it's a full moon that always lives in the shadows," he said.

But a few years ago, now in the mid 50's, Rohrer finally stopped living in the shadows.

Teammates accept Rohrer after he comes out

Three years ago, Rohrer became a popular gay bar in West Hollywood after work and met a man named Joshua Ross.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "This weekend the two will marry. first known former NFL player to be part of the same marriage. "data-reactid =" 47 "> This weekend, the two will marry. Rohrer is the first known former NFL player who is part of a marriage of the same sex.

Rohrer came out to some of his former teammates, but the word spread quickly to others. He has been almost universally supported, in a way he never imagined.

It makes him emotionally talking about it.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = ""The friendliness of my friends and my family and my teammates … It has only been [expletive] ridiculous how nice they have been, and how supportive. And how do they care about any of it. They just love me, they always have. Nothing has changed. Nothing has changed. ""Data Reaction Time =" 50 ">"The friendliness of my friends and my family and my teammates … It has only been [expletive] ridiculous how nice they have been, and how supportive. And how do they care about any of it. They just love me, they always have. Nothing has changed. Nothing has changed. "

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Long-term NFL spokeswoman Greg Aiello, recently retired, was part of Dallass PR staff when Rohrer was with the franchise. He acknowledged New York Times It would have been a taboo for a player to come out as gay during the time that Rohrer played, but the NFL and the member team have worked "to ensure tolerance and inclusion." Long-time NFL spokesman Greg Aiello, who recently retired, was part of Dallass PR staff when Rohrer was with the franchise. He acknowledged that the New York Times would have been a taboo for a player to come out as gay during the time that Rohrer played, but that NFL and member team have worked "to ensure tolerance and inclusion."

"Jeff was a bright and very personal guy that everyone liked," said Aiello. "People who really know Jeff will be happy for him, and proud of him to live his truth."

"I feel I'm 16. I feel revived"

Rohrer celebrates his 60th birthday at Christmas (at least one invitation to the wedding thought Rohrer joked about who he married and that was a way to announce a 60th birthday party) but said he felt "like me 16. I feel revived "as he reads to begin his new life with Ross, a skin care expert.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "During Rohers time with the cowboys, the team was made as a commercial producer he saw his workbook under Super Bowl, including ads for Doritos, Heinz and NFL – he was behind "Super Bowl Baby Legends" commercial who went under Super Bowl LI. "During Robert's time with the cowboys, the team was not successful. However, as a commercial producer, he saw his workbook under Super Bowl, including ads for Doritos, Heinz and NFL – he was behind the" Super Bowl Baby Legends " campaign that ran under Super Bowl LI.


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